Category: Google


At Google, HTTPS is the New HTTP


Security is of paramount importance in applications. APIs are the cornerstone of most applications today and ensuring that the data flowing through the API calls is secure cannot be overemphasized. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) has been available to us for years now and Google has made the first moves in using SSL across its suite of products with a plan to rolling out SSL for most of its developer APIs in the latter part of the year.

Adam Feldman from the Developer Team announced the incorporation of SSL into Google Products and gave a roadmap on which products/APIs of Google are next on incorporating SSL support. Several products like Gmail and Google Docs have already made the transition to mandating SSL. Even Google Maps API is offering SSL to all developers. Several Developer APIs are next and that newer versions of APIs or completely new APIs will be SSL only.

The blog further states that “Beginning September 15, 2011, Google will require that all users of Google Documents List API, Google Spreadsheets API, and Google Sites API use SSL connections for all API requests.” Plain HTTP calls with be disallowed and will result in a 400 Bad Request response. So this is something that developers should note immediately and plan out. The good news is that it should be transparent if you are using the Google Data Client libraries or move to a newer version of the client API that supports SSL. If not, you will need to scan your code for all usages of “http:” and replace them with the http(s) scheme.

Another related post worth reading from Google is Best Practices for User Authentication to ensure that you understand the options available for authenticating any Google user account. This is important so that you understand the 3 forms of authentication available to all Google APIs and the impact that it could have if you are doing programmatic account access in your application that uses the Google APIs.

Going the SSL route has its plus points for sure. But a good question to ask is that if SSL is widely acknowledged as the solution to a lot of data security then why are we all not on SSL yet? Scott Gilberson at wired.com covers a balancing viewpoint in his aptly titled piece HTTPS is more secure, so why isn’t the Web using it?


Boy oh boy! This is one tablet that I am dying to try my hands on, especially after the entire buzz it created at the Consumer Electronics Show, Las Vegas. From the title of the post you might have already guessed that I am talking about Motorola Xoom.The online retailer Infibeam has mentioned that it is releasing the tablet on May 10, 2011 at a pre-order price of Rs. 35000.

As the market continues to get inundated with all new range of tablets, the launch of any new tablet has now become a routine affair. But there is something special about Motorola Xoom that makes its release worth a wait. Touted as the most worthy competitor to Apple IPad (and IPad2), Xoom happens to be Google’s inaugural Honeycomb tablet- and the device that the Honeycomb team actually used to test the software. In that manner, Xoom imbibes in itself the true essence of Android Honeycomb platform, the platform that is specifically designed for tablets.

The specifications look equally impressive. Powered by a dual-core 1GHz Nvidia Tegra SoC processor and 1GB DDR2 RAM, the 10.1-inch (display) tablet clear beats the first generation IPads in certain respects. The device also houses a 2 megapixel front facing camera, a 5 megapixel camera at back panel with 720p HD video record feature, Wi-Fi, gyroscope, accelerometer, barometer and an e-Compass. The battery is powerful enough to support 10 hours of video (and up to 75 hours of music) and the company has also promised a software update that will enable Flash support for the device, something that misses from the entire IPad series.

The Big question: should you buy it?

Motorola Xoom, no doubt is an exciting device. Having said that, there are some points that you should keep in mind before actually buying it.

1) The IPad2 factor: Remember, Motorola Xoom was conceptualized before Apple IPad2 was announced. Xoom, as I mentioned earlier, beats the first generation IPad in certain aspects but not the new IPad2, the one with modified looks, refurbished features and a more powerful processor. However, the availability of IPad2 in India is still not clear and there has been no official word on it so far. So if you don’t want to wait too long, Xoom is the way to go.

2) The price factor: Xoom is available at a price of Rs. 35000. We are expecting 2011 to be the year of tablets and that could mean a flurry of lower-priced alternative, but equally good tablets in the market. So the question is whether you are willing to wait for an unknown amount of time so as to save few hundred bucks. Anyhow, it’s more of a personal judgment.

3) The Android Honeycomb factor: Motorola Xoom was launched in the US markets on 24 Feb 2011 with a very high expectation. But the expectations were not fully met and the sales were weak despite the initial buzz amongst the users. And quite contrary to the expectations, some analysts announced Android 3.0 Honeycomb to be the weakest link. According to them, Honeycomb is “extremely complicated and confusing” and not suitable for mass adoption. The reviews might seem to be little extreme but it is enough to create some doubt in the mind of a potential buyer.

Anyway, I think that it is always better to get the feel of the device first before actually buying it and since the device will now be available in India, you might get a chance to explore it.

So what do you think about the prospects of Motorola Xoom in India? What strategy are you going to adopt- buy it immediately or stick to wait-and-see approach? Both ways, do let us know your reviews in the comments.


Why should i give my build to google or microsoft in the name of cloud or whatever . .

I am going against cloud . . . .

Google is having my ( gmail ) username and password thats much they have . . .

http://www.pcworld.com/article/187875/will_cloud_computing_kill_privacy.html

See the video where CEO of google . . . .. .. . “only the guilty have anything to hide”.

Thank you . . .


Google continues to push away at improving its platform-as-a-service offering, the Google App Engine API. It has already seen two minor releases this year with the latest release bringing in much needed updates to the XMPP and Task Queue APIs. An earlier release in the year focused on the High Replication Datastore, that was clearly targeted to mission critical applications.

The announcement post highlights the main features available in the latest version. The release is available for both Python and Java.

The XMPP API is a key service available in the Google App Engine infrastructure to allow your application to send and receive messages from any XMPP-compliant messaging service, such as Google Talk. The key features added in 1.4.2 release are to do with Subscription and Presence notifications. Your Application can now get notified if a user signs in and out and when their status changes. Your application can also announce its presence details to the users by sending the application’s presence via the sendPresence() call. Optionally, this can include a status message.

The Task Queue API service allows for background processing by inserting tasks (web hooks) into a queue. App Engine will then execute them subject to some criteria. The Task Queue API enhancements include a programmatic way to delete your tasks. Additionally, the API now has a maximum execution rate of 100 tasks per minute and allowing an application to specify the maximum number of concurrent requests per queue.

The App Engine team has an updated roadmap for the product, too. Upcoming features include SSL for non-appspot.com domains, data store import/export tools and integration with the Google Storage API

ICC World Cup Android App


Its a pleasure for me to write this article on my blog, my friend Kavya Bhat who is android developer, has come up with Android App exclusive for ICC Cricket World Cup 2011, if you are cricket fan then you must try this.
You can download the app from android market place

here are the screen shots:

Why Android is better than Symbian


I’ve have been using an Android-powered HTC Wildfire from few weeks, and it’s been quite interesting experience.Now i became lover of Andriod OS.I have noticed several things that why Android completely dominates Symbian and wanted to share with you all.

1. Integration.
This is the first thing that Symbian really needs to address , specifically for Nokia handsets. As a part of procedue,whike setting up your Andriod phones for the first time,the strat up process will ask the user if he has google account,if the user selects yes,all the information such as,contacts,calender etc.. associated with your account is synchronized with the Android device.
But, On a Symbian powered device, the user will have to individually need to download,and set up the mail,contacts and other stuffs.and the user need to repeatedly need to login.
2. Applications.
This is the major advantage for the Andriod users.  At last count, the number of Apps on the Android Market exceeds the 100,000 mark.And still increasing,but Symbian Applications are less compare to Andriod.Its API is based on Java rather than C++ in conventional symbian OS.
3.Platform Updates
Any Patform updates can be done throught the-air, no need to connect to PC then update ur mobile as found on Symbian mobiles.As soon as the Platform updates come, we can update our mobile version from using GPRS/WiFi connection only, no need of PC.Still most of the Symbian featured mobile dont have this option.
4.Browser
The one big thing for me is that the Android browser is much, much better than the Symbian browser. I find I had difficulty opening some web sites on the Symbian browser. The Android browser seems to be able to open almost any web site I would visit on my PC. You can get around the Symbian browser problems by installing a different browser. However, Symbian does not seem to let you change default browsers for all applications. I can change the default browser in Symbian for email links, but I cannot do the same for Gravity (my Twitter app) or Facebook.
Android has surged past Symbian to become the world’s best-selling smartphone operating system, according to Canalys. Now Nokia is also not interested in Symbian ,so they joined with Microsoft to give competition to Android.

http://mashable.com/2011/02/09/advances-digital-entertainment/

Thank you . .


Rule number one : don’t screw around with the browser of your enduser. Say that you were able to filter out the print menu item. What about the keyboard combination ctrl + P? You could override that again with some javascript but that only leaves the enduser clueless as you’re overriding standard functionality and that’s a big nono.

Besides that, you’re using javascript. That can be turned off by an enduser and then your clipboard erasing script also doesn’t work anymore. Poof and there goes your protection level.

try it . .

Thank you


for firefox try as below:

 

    • 1

      Make sure the new media player is installed on your computer. Popular media players include Real Player, QuickTime, Windows Media Player and WinAmp.

    • 2

      Open Mozilla Firefox and click “Tools” and then “Options” on the main menu.

    • 3

      Click the “Applications” tab. Scroll down on the list of file types until you find all of your media file types, including playlists, audio and videos.

    • 4

      Select the “Action” column box next to each of your media file types. You will see a drop-down box.

    • 5

      Change your default media player for each file type by clicking “Use other.” Choose “Always Ask” from the list if you want the browser to ask you every time which media player you want to use, or choose “Save File” if you want to automatically save the file to your computer instead of opening it.

    • 6

      Press “OK” to close the dialog box. Close and restart your browser to activate the new settings. Click on a song or video file in your browser to make sure it recognizes your choice from Step 4 and opens the file in your new default media player.

Thank you . .


Google TV coming to a pocket near you

Last year it was revealed that ARM Holdings was in talks with Google to bring Google TV support to ARM’s chipsets. The first version of Google TV was designed to only work on Intel’s x86 chips, but a fully compatible ARM version should be available this year, according to a report by the ARM-obsessed Charbax of ARMdevices.net.

Tudor Brown, president of Arm, said last year that their latest processors are cheaper and require less power than Intel’s Atom processor. “If Google TV is to be mainstream, it must be built on a lower power system, …on lower cost technology.”

If Google TV support is coming to ARM processors, then you should expect to see someone place it on a smartphone. Any device using a CPU based on ARM’s dual-core Cortex-A9s should have enough horse power to make it work. We have seen some Tegra 2-powered devices like the LG Optimus 2X that support full 1080p output, so the next generation of mobile computers should have no problems running Google TV.

Google was supposed to show off the latest version of Google TV at this year’s CES, but it was reported by the New York Times that Google asked their partners to delay the product launches so they could refine the software.

We can’t say for sure which refinements Google is working on, but it makes sense that they would want to bring the TV experience to the mobile devices that are powerful enough to deliver an enjoyable experience. Motorola recently showed us with the Atrix 4G that a single mobile device could power a laptop, desktop, and TV and I believe that is the direction Google will take Android.

How long do you think it will take before Google TV comes pre-loaded on a high-end smartphone?

Sameer Kulkarni

 

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